Frame_Phantom
Fighting Shield, ‘kumba reipi’
The ‘Phantom’ image first began to appear on New Guinea Highland shields in the late 1970s or early 1980s. They were a spontaneous development by the young warriors who were the first generation to be able to read and write. Many other “new” designs also appeared on shields: football motifs for example, that equated tribal fighting with football competitions. The ‘Phantom’ comic books were readily available in the main towns from 1970s onwards, and young men drew upon two aspects of this comic-book hero; he protected the village people ( albiet set in Africa) from evil men but, above all, he was ‘ The Man Who Never Dies’; and this can be seen written on some shields. Here the Phantom holds two runs, protectively ready to use them when necessary. Warfare was heavily suppressed under the Australian colonial administration, where patrol officers constantly moved among the villages, attempting to stop outbreak of wars before they began – usually but not always succeeding. With Independence, and less autocratic rule, warfare emerged once more; old shields were reused, new ones made. Often these Phantom motifs are painted over older designs, with the abstract pecked designs beneath the newer paintwork.
$990.00

or 4 payments of $247.50 with Afterpay

Mock_Phantom_Small
Fighting Shield, ‘kumba reipi’
The ‘Phantom’ image first began to appear on New Guinea Highland shields in the late 1970s or early 1980s. They were a spontaneous development by the young warriors who were the first generation to be able to read and write. Many other “new” designs also appeared on shields: football motifs for example, that equated tribal fighting with football competitions. The ‘Phantom’ comic books were readily available in the main towns from 1970s onwards, and young men drew upon two aspects of this comic-book hero; he protected the village people ( albiet set in Africa) from evil men but, above all, he was ‘ The Man Who Never Dies’; and this can be seen written on some shields. Here the Phantom holds two runs, protectively ready to use them when necessary. Warfare was heavily suppressed under the Australian colonial administration, where patrol officers constantly moved among the villages, attempting to stop outbreak of wars before they began – usually but not always succeeding. With Independence, and less autocratic rule, warfare emerged once more; old shields were reused, new ones made. Often these Phantom motifs are painted over older designs, with the abstract pecked designs beneath the newer paintwork.
$550.00

or 4 payments of $137.50 with Afterpay

Mock_Yellow-Phantom-Shield
Fighting Shield, ‘kumba reipi’
The ‘Phantom’ image first began to appear on New Guinea Highland shields in the late 1970s or early 1980s. They were a spontaneous development by the young warriors who were the first generation to be able to read and write. Many other “new” designs also appeared on shields: football motifs for example, that equated tribal fighting with football competitions. The ‘Phantom’ comic books were readily available in the main towns from 1970s onwards, and young men drew upon two aspects of this comic-book hero; he protected the village people ( albiet set in Africa) from evil men but, above all, he was ‘ The Man Who Never Dies’; and this can be seen written on some shields. Here the Phantom holds two runs, protectively ready to use them when necessary. Warfare was heavily suppressed under the Australian colonial administration, where patrol officers constantly moved among the villages, attempting to stop outbreak of wars before they began – usually but not always succeeding. With Independence, and less autocratic rule, warfare emerged once more; old shields were reused, new ones made. Often these Phantom motifs are painted over older designs, with the abstract pecked designs beneath the newer paintwork.
$550.00

or 4 payments of $137.50 with Afterpay

Mock_Green-Phantom-Shield
Fighting Shield, ‘kumba reipi’
The ‘Phantom’ image first began to appear on New Guinea Highland shields in the late 1970s or early 1980s. They were a spontaneous development by the young warriors who were the first generation to be able to read and write. Many other “new” designs also appeared on shields: football motifs for example, that equated tribal fighting with football competitions. The ‘Phantom’ comic books were readily available in the main towns from 1970s onwards, and young men drew upon two aspects of this comic-book hero; he protecetd the village people ( albiet set in Africa) from evil men but, above all, he was ‘ The Man Who Never Dies’; and this can be seen written on some shields. Here the Phantom holds two runs, protectively ready to use them when necessary. Warfare was heavily suppressed under the Australian colonial administration, where patrol officers constantly moved among the villages, attempting to stop outbreak of wars before they began – usually but not always succeeding. With Independence, and less autocratic rule, warfare emerged once more; old shields were reused, new ones made. Often these Phantom motifs are painted over older designs, with the abstract pecked designs beneath the newer paintwork.
$550.00

or 4 payments of $137.50 with Afterpay

Frame_Green-Phantom-Shield
Fighting Shield, ‘kumba reipi’
The ‘Phantom’ image first began to appear on New Guinea Highland shields in the late 1970s or early 1980s. They were a spontaneous development by the young warriors who were the first generation to be able to read and write. Many other “new” designs also appeared on shields: football motifs for example, that equated tribal fighting with football competitions. The ‘Phantom’ comic books were readily available in the main towns from 1970s onwards, and young men drew upon two aspects of this comic-book hero; he protecetd the village people ( albiet set in Africa) from evil men but, above all, he was ‘ The Man Who Never Dies’; and this can be seen written on some shields. Here the Phantom holds two runs, protectively ready to use them when necessary. Warfare was heavily suppressed under the Australian colonial administration, where patrol officers constantly moved among the villages, attempting to stop outbreak of wars before they began – usually but not always succeeding. With Independence, and less autocratic rule, warfare emerged once more; old shields were reused, new ones made. Often these Phantom motifs are painted over older designs, with the abstract pecked designs beneath the newer paintwork.
$990.00

or 4 payments of $247.50 with Afterpay

Mock_Amethyst-Magnolias
Amethyst Magnolias
Flowers burst out from Alesandro Ljubicic’s large, textured canvases. Sweeps and daubs of vivid colour convey his intense response to the beauty of nature. Ljubicic’s less resolved Colour Studies share the same emotional charge. These smaller panels, created at the same time as the larger flower works, further explore the effects of layering paint. Whorls and waves of different colours resist blending together, competing to be the most vibrant. The trace of Ljubicic’s brush and palette knife is clearly visible; dragging and scooping thick layers of oil paint to create sculptural surfaces. Born in Jajce, in central Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ljubicic studied at the National Art School. After graduating in 2007 he founded The Sydney Art Store.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay

Dixie-Blossom-Among-Cerulean-web
Dixie Blossom Among Cerulen
Flowers burst out from Alesandro Ljubicic’s large, textured canvases. Sweeps and daubs of vivid colour convey his intense response to the beauty of nature. Ljubicic’s less resolved Colour Studies share the same emotional charge. These smaller panels, created at the same time as the larger flower works, further explore the effects of layering paint. Whorls and waves of different colours resist blending together, competing to be the most vibrant. The trace of Ljubicic’s brush and palette knife is clearly visible; dragging and scooping thick layers of oil paint to create sculptural surfaces. Born in Jajce, in central Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ljubicic studied at the National Art School. After graduating in 2007 he founded The Sydney Art Store.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay

Perylene-Quin-Rose-mockup-web
Perylene Quin Rose
Flowers burst out from Alesandro Ljubicic’s large, textured canvases. Sweeps and daubs of vivid colour convey his intense response to the beauty of nature. Ljubicic’s less resolved Colour Studies share the same emotional charge. These smaller panels, created at the same time as the larger flower works, further explore the effects of layering paint. Whorls and waves of different colours resist blending together, competing to be the most vibrant. The trace of Ljubicic’s brush and palette knife is clearly visible; dragging and scooping thick layers of oil paint to create sculptural surfaces. Born in Jajce, in central Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ljubicic studied at the National Art School. After graduating in 2007 he founded The Sydney Art Store.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay

Mock_Yellow-Phantom-Shield_crop
Fighting Shield, ‘kumba reipi’
The ‘Phantom’ image first began to appear on New Guinea Highland shields in the late 1970s or early 1980s. They were a spontaneous development by the young warriors who were the first generation to be able to read and write. Many other “new” designs also appeared on shields: football motifs for example, that equated tribal fighting with football competitions. The ‘Phantom’ comic books were readily available in the main towns from 1970s onwards, and young men drew upon two aspects of this comic-book hero; he protecetd the village people ( albiet set in Africa) from evil men but, above all, he was ‘ The Man Who Never Dies’; and this can be seen written on some shields. Here the Phantom holds two runs, protectively ready to use them when necessary. Warfare was heavily suppressed under the Australian colonial administration, where patrol officers constantly moved among the villages, attempting to stop outbreak of wars before they began – usually but not always succeeding. With Independence, and less autocratic rule, warfare emerged once more; old shields were reused, new ones made. Often these Phantom motifs are painted over older designs, with the abstract pecked designs beneath the newer paintwork.
$990.00

or 4 payments of $247.50 with Afterpay

Mock_Margot-Tenenbaum
Margot Tenenbaum
Marc Etherington’s works take pop culture, childhood memories and everyday domestic life as their subject matter, rendering them through a darkly humorous and sometimes absurd lens. References to Jurassic Park, Freddy Krueger, old-school video game aesthetics and boom-boxes point to experiences of coming of age in the 1980s and 1990s, while landscapes and interiors are depicted with an eye for amusing detail. Self-taught, Etherington has maintained a consistent practice in painting and small sculpture for over a decade and more recently has worked with larger scale sculptural installations and ceramics. His sculptural works touch on themes such as mass production and collectibles. Etherington’s portraits of fellow artists, Ken Done (2016) and Del Kathryn Barton (2015) have been finalists in the Archibald Prize at the Art Gallery NSW.  He has also exhibited in John Fries Art Award at UNSW Art & Design and The Fisher’s Ghost at Campbelltown Arts Centre (both 2014). In 2015 Etherington held a solo exhibition at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay

Mock_King-Ken
King Ken
Marc Etherington’s works take pop culture, childhood memories and everyday domestic life as their subject matter, rendering them through a darkly humorous and sometimes absurd lens. References to Jurassic Park, Freddy Krueger, old-school video game aesthetics and boom-boxes point to experiences of coming of age in the 1980s and 1990s, while landscapes and interiors are depicted with an eye for amusing detail. Self-taught, Etherington has maintained a consistent practice in painting and small sculpture for over a decade and more recently has worked with larger scale sculptural installations and ceramics. His sculptural works touch on themes such as mass production and collectibles. Etherington’s portraits of fellow artists, Ken Done (2016) and Del Kathryn Barton (2015) have been finalists in the Archibald Prize at the Art Gallery NSW. He has also exhibited in John Fries Art Award at UNSW Art & Design and The Fisher’s Ghost at Campbelltown Arts Centre (both 2014). In 2015 Etherington held a solo exhibition at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay

Mock_Sydney-Spider
Sydney Spider Chart
Marc Etherington’s works take pop culture, childhood memories and everyday domestic life as their subject matter, rendering them through a darkly humorous and sometimes absurd lens. References to Jurassic Park, Freddy Krueger, old-school video game aesthetics and boom-boxes point to experiences of coming of age in the 1980s and 1990s, while landscapes and interiors are depicted with an eye for amusing detail. Self-taught, Etherington has maintained a consistent practice in painting and small sculpture for over a decade and more recently has worked with larger scale sculptural installations and ceramics. His sculptural works touch on themes such as mass production and collectibles. Etherington’s portraits of fellow artists, Ken Done (2016) and Del Kathryn Barton (2015) have been finalists in the Archibald Prize at the Art Gallery NSW. He has also exhibited in John Fries Art Award at UNSW Art & Design and The Fisher’s Ghost at Campbelltown Arts Centre (both 2014). In 2015 Etherington held a solo exhibition at Hazelhurst Regional Gallery.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay

Mock_Indeterminate-depth-and-space
Indeterminate depth and space
Unsurprisingly for someone whose family has farmed for generations, Lucy Vader conveys a landscape that has been both seen and felt. She applies paint in thick, sumptuous layers blurring the boundary between abstraction and representation. Stand close to one of Vader’s works and her brushstrokes draw you into a richly textured world of deep colours – green, yellow, red and blue. Move away from the canvas and wide, grassy paddocks emerge, frequently populated by sheep – golden and camouflaged against parched yellow land, or with bright white fleeces that contrast with rain-restored grass. Vader’s sheep graze, run off or just look inscrutable, contributing a light-heartedness for which she has become known. Vader has degrees in both Fine Art and Architecture. She is also an accomplished sculptor and has exhibited in Sculpture by the Sea.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay

Mock_Sleep-when-day-is-done
Sleep when the day is done
Unsurprisingly for someone whose family has farmed for generations, Lucy Vader conveys a landscape that has been both seen and felt. She applies paint in thick, sumptuous layers blurring the boundary between abstraction and representation. Stand close to one of Vader’s works and her brushstrokes draw you into a richly textured world of deep colours – green, yellow, red and blue. Move away from the canvas and wide, grassy paddocks emerge, frequently populated by sheep – golden and camouflaged against parched yellow land, or with bright white fleeces that contrast with rain-restored grass. Vader’s sheep graze, run off or just look inscrutable, contributing a light-heartedness for which she has become known. Vader has degrees in both Fine Art and Architecture. She is also an accomplished sculptor and has exhibited in Sculpture by the Sea.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay

Mock_Theres-only-us
There’s only us
Unsurprisingly for someone whose family has farmed for generations, Lucy Vader conveys a landscape that has been both seen and felt. She applies paint in thick, sumptuous layers blurring the boundary between abstraction and representation. Stand close to one of Vader’s works and her brushstrokes draw you into a richly textured world of deep colours – green, yellow, red and blue. Move away from the canvas and wide, grassy paddocks emerge, frequently populated by sheep – golden and camouflaged against parched yellow land, or with bright white fleeces that contrast with rain-restored grass. Vader’s sheep graze, run off or just look inscrutable, contributing a light-heartedness for which she has become known. Vader has degrees in both Fine Art and Architecture. She is also an accomplished sculptor and has exhibited in Sculpture by the Sea.
$880.00

or 4 payments of $220.00 with Afterpay